Long Corridor

The Long Corridor
 
 
 
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The Long Corridor was first built in 1750, when the Qianlong Emperor commissioned work to convert the area into an imperial garden. The corridor was constructed so that the emperor's mother could enjoy a walk through the gardens protected from the elements. Like most of the Summer Palace, the Long Corridor was severely damaged by fire which Anglo-French allied forces laid in 1860 during the Second Opium War. It was rebuilt in 1886. As a part of the Summer Palace, the Long Corridor was included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. It measures seven hundred and twenty-eight metres and has an amazing fourteen thousand paintings depicting birds, flowers, landscapes and stories from Chinese literary classics. Four octagonal, double-eaved pavilions, “Clear and Carefree”, “Autumn Water”, “Harmonising with the Lake” and “Mesmerising Scenery” were built intermittently along the corridor.
 
 
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Taking the Hall of Dispelling Clouds as the centre, the Long Corridor stretches symmetrically to the east and west along the foot of the hill and the lakeshore.................
 
 
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............linking all the structures scattered along Longevity Hill into a whole.
 
 
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The Long Corridor starts from Yaoyue (Inviting the Moon) Gate in the east and ends at Shizhang (Stone Old Man) Pavilion in the west. Some pictures along the way.
 
 
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ALL IN ALL QUITE EXTRAORDINARY

                     A VERY CROWDED COVERED WAY, BEAUTIFUL IN ITS DAY