Thames Tiny Start

Beez Neez
Skipper and First Mate Millard (Big Bear and Pepe)
Mon 12 May 2014 22:57
The Very Start of the River Thames or Is It ?????
 
 
 
 
 
 
We left Whitley Bay after breakfast, once more through the tunnel under the River Tyne. Flushed with the success of gaining our LRPS yesterday, Bear organised a cross country route through Oxfordshire and located a shop where I could try out many different camera bags - my current back sack crams everything too tightly together and the zips have suffered some pretty bad salt damage. What a joy to mostly avoid the motorways in preference to country roads passing through some stunning English countryside.
 
 
IMG_2379  IMG_2380
 
What a beast – not light it has to be said......Oh wait, I have a Bear who will carry it. Huh.
 
 
 
My trusty ‘bearer’ Ha Ha Ha and Huh..........then made a surprise stop for me to see the ‘argued’ start of the River Thames at Seven Springs in Gloucestershire. He parked the car next to a small pit like area, with little to see but a few bushes, very understated.
 
 
IMG_2104
 
I went down some steps.................
 
 
IMG_2103
 
..........and there it was.
 
 
IMG_2106  IMG_2105
 
To my left a pipe, to my right a roughly hewn business.
 
 
 
Climbing back up I did pass this lovely wild poppy.
 
 
 
We stopped to read the sign. Mmmm.
 
 
Thames Beginning
 
On the other hand. Thames Head is a site in Gloucestershire, traditionally identified as the source of the River Thames, a major river which runs through the centre of London. It lies near the village of Kemble and the town of Cirencester.

The claim that Thames Head is the source of the River Thames is disputed. The Environment Agency, the Ordnance Survey and other authorities have the source of the Thames as the nearby Trewsbury Mead. Others hold that the true source of the Thames is at Seven Springs, Gloucestershire, some eleven miles further north, and east of Gloucester. Officially, however, Seven Springs is the source of the River Churn, a tributary of the Thames that joins at Cricklade. This tributary, by its distance rising further than Trewsbury Mead, would therefore result in the Seven Springs being the ultimate source of the Thames. A monument beneath an ash tree bears the inscription:

 

THE CONSERVATORS OF THE RIVER THAMES
1857-1974
THIS STONE WAS PLACED HERE TO MARK THE
SOURCE OF THE RIVER THAMES

 

A nearby basin of stones marks the spring. However, there is usually only water during a wet winter. Whatever, it is generally known that the River Thames runs for two hundred and fifteen miles and her highest elevation is at three hundred and sixty one feet.

 

 

IMG_2117

IMG_2125 

 

The final bit of our journey was to be on the M5, great sky though.

 

 

 

My last surprise of the day, Bear took me to see my mum and dad. In the late afternoon sun, simply lovely.

 

 

 

 

 

ALL IN ALL GREAT DIVERSIONS