Narao

Position: 32 50.77 N 129 03.67 E
Alongside Narao
Wind: Mostly light and variable
Day's run: 18 nm

We had a total of ten miles to sail today, so I did not feel anxious about needing to get underway early, nonetheless we were away from the pontoon at 9.30, had sails up and the motor off by 9.40, and then . . . we drifted. The ebbing tide helped quite a bit, pushing us north close along the coast of Kabashima, and we had puffs of wind from time to time which helped us remain clear of the rocks. So with the tide and the fitful puffs we eventually worked our way clear of the northern headland of Kabashima where, at a little after one, we found a decent breeze at last. It was from the north east, so a head wind, but a breeze nonetheless, not too strong but more than enough. Sylph heeled over to it and started to sluice the waves over her side decks in her usual manner when she is enjoying herself.

It wasn't long before we made our way around the southern headland of the island of our next destination, Nakadorishima, our destination Narao. We held the breeze all the way into the harbour, where we rounded up into the wind, dropped the mainsail, started the engine and motored to the pontoon that was recommended by Bosun Bird in her cruising notes. Once settled I thought it best to try to find someone to give us permission to be where we were. Despite Bosun Bird's recommendation the pontoon was large, in good order and looked like it was in commercial use. I did not feel comfortable lying there without some assurance from someone in authority that it was OK to do so.

With this objective in mind I went for a wander. The first likely building I came to right next to where Sylph was tied up turned out to be a small hospital. I decided the next most likely place to try would be the ferry terminal. I went to the ticket window to try and see if the salesperson could tell me where the harbour master, or Japanese equivalent, might be. Eventually, with about five people standing around me at the large glass windows overlooking the harbour, gesticulating like a game of Pictionary, it seemed my inquiry met with a sudden awakening of understanding. A man who looked more like a janitor than anyone in a position of responsibility (and I do not mean this disrespectfully) made it clear that it was not OK for Sylph to be tied up where she was, but rather should move to the inside of the ferry terminal. While the uniform did not inspire, the man's confidence and the nodding approval of those around him did, so I high tailed it back to Sylph, started the motor and fifteen minutes later was tied up in the approved position. Exactly who approved it, goodness knows, but no one has objected thus far.

Once secured I went for a short walk to get my bearings around town. The town is small but looks interesting. Tomorrow I will explore further and try to give a bit of a description. While the town looks interesting I must admit that I am disappointed that my mobile wi-fi does not have a connection, as I fear that my online studies may suffer if I do not find one soon. Not to worry, I have plenty of readings to get through, and an assignment to work on, so I am sure I can stay abreast of things provided I can get somewhere where I can reconnect with the online world soon. For now I am trying to make sense of sentences such as this, "The Idea of Good would also be the Form of Being, but not reducible to being merely the Form of Being." Good grief! Any ideas? Something to do with Plato's idea of forms I think.

All is well..