Niue

We had a really good passage to Niue and we were delighted tobe able to pick up the last available mooring. The best mooring of the trip, really well maintained and with great reflective strips on the buoy so that night entry would be easy. Unusually they have a derrick and you lift your tender out of the water. It takes a bit of time (kids love the opportunity of using a piece of heavy machinery) but you can go out for the day completely carefree and sandless.
 
 
Niue yacht club provides a very warm welcome and serves yummy ice cream. The island was nicknamed the savage island by Captain Cook who turned up to trade trinkets and the locals told him to take a hike assisted by some spear throwing. The Niueans insist the unfriendly reception was simply a traditional challenge. The island has about 100 tourist beds so the yachties are often up to a third of the total visitor numbers.
 
The island is amazing. The east coast is very rough.
 
 
 
 
This ladder is down to a sandy beach in a chasm in massive volcanic rock pinnacles - truly spectacular, impossible to do justice to it in a photograph.
 
 
 
The Royal Pool was typical of the fresh- and salt-water pools. The top layer is cold and blurry, underneath the water is warm and clear. All the pools are this strange combination of halo-and thermo-clines.
 
 
 
Everything about this island is a little strange and unusual.