News & pics Mayreau, Tobago Cays & Union Islands - by Carol

12:38.819N 061:23.454W

 

 

After 10 days on board, today we start a trend: a ‘guest blog’.  Thus, Carol hereunder recounts her impressions from the past few days on the good ship Talulah...

 

The last day in Mustique was hectic, 10 round-trips on the Northern Line Underground would have been a picnic in comparison.  We took a pick-up truck tour around the island and saw all the mansions overlooking stunning views.  The whole island is a manicured garden and one can see why the island is often referred to as the playground for the rich. After shopping for provisions, we dolled up to go to the Firefly for dinner.  A fancy restaurant with stunning views and the best martinis I’ve ever had. Then on for a nightcap at Basil’s Bar where the last night of the Blues’ Festival was in full swing.  By 1am we were toast and dinghied back to the boat to what we thought would be a quick turn-in. Alas, as we were partying to the cool beat of the Blues, hundreds of fruit bats were doing the same with our stock of bananas in Talulah. Whilst Shane marvelled at the beauty of nature and the bats’ ability to smell their prey from ashore with such precision, Ali and I screeched as the bats flew at fighter-jet speed across the cockpit and dive-bombing the freshly-cleaned decks with their poo. Hitchcock would’ve had a field day. 

 

Our next stop was Mayreau and on our way Shane caught a barracuda – a menacing beast, with sharp teeth and aggressive demeanour.  Whilst our Hunter & Gatherer managed to wrestle it on deck, Ali poured ¼ bottle of rum down its gills.  They say it stuns them, I grieved the loss of rum.

 

Mayreau is a small island of less than 3 sq. km with a big history. The mainly Catholic population descends from slaves of the old French colonists who were in residence until the end of the 18th century.  Although its people built a large public reservoir with their bare hands under the inspiration of the resident Catholic monk about 50 years ago, fresh water is limited and a very expensive commodity.  This, together with a serious drought they are experiencing, inspired Ali to fill a few bottles with our water to give away during our travels inland. The lucky ones were the goats – a few cries from these and she was theirs, and we have photos to prove it!  We anchored in Salt Whistle bay, a picture-perfect setting and spent a couple of days snorkelling during the day and fighting with the fruit bats at night.  Yes, my friends, it was the night of the Return of the Bats and this time they were more bold and aggressive. Under attack, Ali dis-engaged the (remaining) bananas from their bimini hammocks and threw them overboard but it was a while before they realised their prey was at the bottom of the sea ‘swimming with the fishes’ in Corleone-style. Stupid creatures…

 

Next to Tobago Cays, the jewel of the Caribbean.  The water is impossibly turquoise and the reefs are full of exotic fish.  To top it, it is a breeding ground of sea turtles that are very welcoming and allow you to swim with them.  As Nemo would say, cool duuuuuude. Magical. After 2 days, mostly spent underwater, we left to Union Island where we are now.  I will now handover the blog relay to my hosts, who are treating me like a Queen and feeding me like a whale. If they are not careful, I will stay in their good ship forever.  As I finalise my contribution, Ali & Shane return from rescuing a fisherman whose boat just sunk – I kid you not!!!!  Och well, all in a day’s sailing…

 

 

 

Mustique, the anchorage

 

 

Macaroni Bay, Mustique: Shane & Carol sightseeing whilst Ali cleans boat

 

 

 

Stop kidding around, Ali feeding goat water in Mayreau Island

 

 

Kids goating around after school game, Mayreau

 

 

View from Mayreau Catholic Church, overlooking Tobago Cays

 

 

Carol relaxed?  Noooo, just snorkelling upside down – not quite got the hang of it yet!

 

 

At anchor in Clifton, Union Island, overlooking reef

 

 

Shane & Carol in Castello’s Art bar, one of many funky bars in Union