Sambro to Lunenburg

Back Across the Pond - Summer 2017
John Andrews
Thu 19 May 2016 12:23
44:03.0N  064:18.2W

We took Roy’s advice and made a lunch stop at “Rogue’s Roost”, a tricky rock strewn entrance to an idyllic anchorage, apparently completely packed out in the summer with ‘the outboard boombox crowd from Halifax’ as the Cruising Guide puts it.This early in the season however we found ourselves completely on our own in a secluded inlet with sparkling water and a clear blue sky. A pair of Canada geese (very appropriate) swam past and a brown furry animal with a long bushy tail appeared on the bank to snuffle around for a bit - a mink we later found out.  

We then moved on to Hubbard’s Cove but found all the promised pontoons moored for the winter in the middle of the bay so picked up a mooring for the night. The settlement was faintly reminiscent of Newton Ferrers and could be a fun place in the summer but very quiet now and we didn’t feel the need to launch the dinghy to visit. 


On then to Lunenburg, which is a gem of a place. They were just putting their pontoons out and we were shooed off the first one we tied up to as it wasn't actually tethered to the land. The town was preparing itself for opening up - the wooden houses being painted, hanging baskets being filled. ‘Blue Nose’ the fabled Canadian schooner was unfortunately closed to visitors, but was swarming with people painting, varnishing and generally fettling up.  



We spent two days here and enjoyed meeting up with locals and the few other yachts in town. Meeting with the yachts made us feel that we were still part of the ‘adventuring’ community, exchanging information on Greenland, Labrador etc like old pros and listening to others’ exciting cruising plans - Iceland and Norway for example!  

 


We contacted Michele Stevens who had repaired our damaged mainsail two years ago. She came aboard and gladly accepted the $15 that her bank had taken off her for the privilege of receiving our money. She was great value, a fourth generation sailmaker and possibly sixth generation Nova Scotian. 

We also made contact with Duncan Veasey, ex RN doctor now living in Nova Scotia and rear commodore of the Lunenburg Schooner Association, responsible for organising the schooner racing in Lunenburg Bay. His schooner had just been launched so we were invited to have a look around. She was a beautiful old wooden boat, lovely lines but no mod cons, hand pumped sea water to the small sink and heads situated conveniently but exposed underneath the companionway, facing the open cabin. Duncan and his son Charlie were great company and treated us to a magnificent but filling Lunenburg breakfast at the Savvy Sailor, overlooking the harbour.

 








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